The Christmas Truce 1914

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With Christmas around the corner here’s an interesting fact.

In 1914, on Christmas Day, there was unofficial cease fire which took place across the western front between British and German soldiers. They climbed out of their trenches and ventured out into No Man’s Land, where they greeted their enemies, setting aside their differences for a fleeting moment to celebrate the holiday together. They shared seasonal greetings, sang Christmas songs between the trenches and out in  “no man’s land” they exchanged food, souvenirs and cigarettes.

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Casualties of War Infographic

Here is an interesting infographic on the casualties of war. Giving us a very good idea of how many people that lost their lives to War. What are your impressions after seeing these numbers?

When you put a number on things it definitely changes our perspective.

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The Trenches of Verdun, France in 1916

Our film takes place in Verdun, France and so we thought it would be nice to look into it’s history and see what it really looked like back in 1916.

 

The Battle of Verdun is considered the greatest and lengthiest in world history. Never before or since has there been such a lengthy battle, involving so many men, situated on such a tiny piece of land. The battle, which lasted from 21 February 1916 until 19 December 1916 caused over an estimated 700,000 casualties (dead, wounded and missing). The battlefield was not even a square ten kilometres. From a strategic point of view there can be no justification for these atrocious losses. The battle degenerated into a matter of prestige of two nations literally for the sake of fighting. (Except from Battle of Verdun Website)

 

Here is a look into the trenches of Verdun in 1916:

Verdun is still littered with so many bodies, arsenic and unexploded shells that nothing grows after 100 years.

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WW1 in Poetry

In last week’s post ‘Interesting Facts About WW1’ there was the mention of Wilfred Owen, a British soldier that died only a week before the war ended. However, he has not been forgotten, now he is remembered as a poet.

Wilfred Owen is regarded by many as the greatest poet of the First World War. Throughout the war Owen wrote poems to describe what he experienced at the frontline, on the horrors of the trench and gas warfare.

So we thought it would be a good idea to share with you one of his most famous poems:

Wilfred Owen

Dulce et Decorum Est

By Wilfred Owen

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs,
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots,
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.

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Interesting Facts About WW1

Today we thought we’d bring you some interesting facts about World War 1 that perhaps you didn’t know before. It’s important to keep educating ourselves and to be more aware. These days we get so wrapped up in ourselves and it the little things in life, so in keeping up our own education it is a great way to pay respects for those before us that fought for a better world.

 

Output file processed by Ted Dearberg

Output file processed by Ted Dearberg

 

Here are 12 interesting facts:

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100 years…

… since the start of World War 1

Taking a look back at last year which marked 100 years of the start of World War 1.

28th July 1914, World War 1 broke out and lasted until 11th November 1918.

In London last year we saw lots of beautiful commemorations around the city. The most popular one being the field of glass poppies that surrounded the Tower of London. Each poppy symbolised a soldier that lost his life in the war.

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